Nov 25, 2008

Yantra Yoga



Yantra Yoga traditionally consists of 108 movements, including bodily movements (or dynamic asana), incantations (or mantra), breathwork, and visualizations, all timed to heart rhythms.

More info: http://tibet-incense.com/blog/yantra-yoga/

8 comments:

Darren said...

There is also a new book by Chogyal Namkhai Norbu Rinpoche called Yantra Yoga by Snow Lion Publications. It is a pure lineage of transmission dating back to Vairochana.

There's also a book tour with certified Yantra Yoga teachers going around the US. We just had them in Portland. For details visit http://www.yantrayoga.org

-d

Ritesh said...

Yoga is an art of discipline that was developed by an Indian Hindu named Patanjali. Retreat yoga about benefits of yoga exercises, yoga meditation, yoga practice.

jindi said...

Recognized as one of the finest Yoga retreats in the world, sivanandabahamas is dedicated to promoting the authentic spiritual tradition of Yoga, in an environment normally associated with an exclusive star hotel. We endeavour to embody the spiritual tradition of Athithi devo Bhava (serving the Guest as an embodiment of the Divine) and the staff at sivanandabahamas are trying to practice all facets of Yoga in their daily lives. At sivanandabahamas, you get a unique insight into Yoga, irrespective of whether you are a beginner or have practiced for many years.

sivanandabahamas is situated in bahamas where the emphasis is to live an ashram style life (daily yoga, meditation sessions, chanting classes, organic vegetarian food, no alcohol, community service, farming etc.) in private, serene and "simply" luxurious accommodation and facilities. In a typical Yoga Retreat, guests practice different facets of Yoga - for physical strength, balance and flexibility, for physiological & therapeutic benefits and if they are interested, for pursuing a spiritual path through various types of meditation.
yoga retreat

jindi said...

Recognized as one of the finest Yoga retreats in the world, sivanandabahamas is dedicated to promoting the authentic spiritual tradition of Yoga, in an environment normally associated with an exclusive star hotel. We endeavour to embody the spiritual tradition of Athithi devo Bhava (serving the Guest as an embodiment of the Divine) and the staff at sivanandabahamas are trying to practice all facets of Yoga in their daily lives. At sivanandabahamas, you get a unique insight into Yoga, irrespective of whether you are a beginner or have practiced for many years. sivanandabahamas is situated in bahamas where the emphasis is to live an ashram style life (daily yoga, meditation sessions, chanting classes, organic vegetarian food, no alcohol, community service, farming etc.) in private, serene and "simply" luxurious accommodation and facilities. In a typical Yoga Retreat, guests practice different facets of Yoga - for physical strength, balance and flexibility, for physiological & therapeutic benefits and if they are interested, for pursuing a spiritual path through various types of meditation.
Retreat yoga

jindi said...

Yoga holds that a person’s health condition depends on himself. It lays emphasis on physical, mental and emotional balance and development of a sense of harmony with all of life. There’s nothing mystical about it.Nor is it external. Rather it is an inner faculty. Yoga endeavors to re-establish inner balance through a variety of ways, ranging from the gross to the subtle. Which is why it is considered a holistic art.Rather than prescribe treatments, yoga therapy encourages awareness. Through age-old yogic techniques, we get to know ourselves better.From that knowledge, comes the ability to more easily accept and adapt to change, resulting in enhanced well-being in body, mind, heart and spirit. Hence its applicability to almost all chronic conditions.

What approach does yoga therapy take?

Contrary to modern medical science that tries to identify the pathogenic factor (be it a toxic substance, a micro-organism, or metabolic disorder) then eliminate it, Yoga takes a totally different point of view. It holds that if a person is sick there must be a deeper reason behind it – that illness doesn’t arise by chance. It is the result of an imbalance, a disruption in the body-mind complex that creates the condition. Here the symptoms, the pathogenic factors, are not the issue. Yoga believes that the root cause lies somewhere else.
yoga therapy

jindi said...

Swami Vishnu-devananda was the first in the West to develop a training program for yoga teachers. He did this not only with the vision to develop yoga professionals, but also to give sincere aspirants the skills of personal discipline and to develop messengers of peace. The Course is a profound, personal experience, based on the ancient gurukula teaching system, integrating the student's daily life into the yoga training. By the end of the intensive four-week course the student will possess a firm foundation for teaching others, in addition to strengthening his or her own yoga practice with self-discipline and awareness of the nature of body, mind and spirit. Upon graduation from the course, students receive a certificate of qualification. The program has seen the graduation of more than eleven thousand students over the last thirty years. Men and women come from all around the world take part in the training, which is given in English with simultaneous translation into European languages, as well as Hebrew, Japanese, Hindi, Tamil and Malayalam.


we developed a program that teaches you everything you need to know to teach yoga AND run a successful yoga business - and you can learn it from home, at your own pace.

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Equally important, I've developed courses and tools to help Yoga Teachers run successful Yoga Teacher businesses. After all, it's one thing to devote yourself to doing what you love (Yoga), but it's quite another to be able to support yourself comfortably and securely while doing it. You won't learn these skills at a typical Yoga Teacher Camp.
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jindi said...

Yoga (Sanskrit, Pali: yóga) refers to traditional physical and mental disciplines originating in India. The word is associated with meditative practices in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. In Hinduism, it also refers to one of the six orthodox (astika) schools of Hindu philosophy, and to the goal toward which that school directs its practices. In Jainism it refers to the sum total of all activities—mental, verbal and physical.

Major branches of yoga in Hindu philosophy include Raja Yoga, Karma Yoga, Jnana Yoga, Bhakti Yoga, and Hatha Yoga. Raja Yoga, compiled in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, and known simply as yoga in the context of Hindu philosophy, is part of the Samkhya tradition.[10] Many other Hindu texts discuss aspects of yoga, including Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, the Hatha Yoga Pradipika, the Shiva Samhita and various Tantras.

The Sanskrit word yoga has many meanings, and is derived from the Sanskrit root "yuj," meaning "to control," "to yoke" or "to unite."[12] Translations include "joining," "uniting," "union," "conjunction," and "means." Outside India, the term yoga is typically associated with Hatha Yoga and its asanas (postures) or as a form of exercise. Someone who practices yoga or follows the yoga philosophy is called a yogi or yogini

yoga

jindi said...

Ayurveda is a holistic healing science which comprises of two words, Ayu and Veda. Ayu means life and Veda means knowledge or science. So the literal meaning of the word Ayurveda is the science of life. Ayurveda is a science dealing not only with treatment of some diseases but is a complete way of life. Read More
"Ayurveda treats not just the ailment but the whole person and emphasizes prevention of disease to avoid the need for cure."
Ayurvedic Medicine has become an increasingly accepted alternative medical treatment in America during the last two decades.
Benefits of Ayurvedic Medicines
* By using ayurvedic and herbal medicines you ensure physical and mental health without side effects. The natural ingredients of herbs help bring “arogya” to human body and mind. ("Arogya" means free from diseases). The chemicals used in preparing allopathy medicines have impact on mind as well. One should have allopathy medicine only when it is very necessary.
* According to the original texts, the goal of Ayurveda is prevention as well as promotion of the body’s own capacity for maintenance and balance.
* Ayurvedic treatment is non-invasive and non-toxic, so it can be used safely as an alternative therapy or alongside conventional therapies.
* Ayurvedic physicians claim that their methods can also help stress-related, metabolic, and chronic conditions.
* Ayurveda has been used to treat acne, allergies, asthma, anxiety, arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, colds, colitis, constipation, depression, diabetes, flu, heart disease, hypertension, immune problems, inflammation, insomnia, nervous disorders, obesity, skin problems, and ulcers.


Ayurvedic Terms Explained

Dosha: In Ayurvedic philosophy, the five elements combine in pairs to form three dynamic forces or interactions called doshas. It is also known as the governing principles as every living things in nature is characterized by the dosha.

Ayurvedic Facial: Purportedly, a "therapeutic skin care experience" that involves the use of "dosha-specific" products and a facial massage focusing on "marma points."

Ayurvedic Nutrition (Ayurvedic Diet): Nutritional phase of Ayurveda. It involves eating according to (a) one's "body type" and (b) the "season." The alleged activity of the doshas--three "bodily humors," "dynamic forces," or "spirits that possess"--determines one's "body type." In Ayurveda, "body types" number seven, eight, or ten, and "seasons" traditionally number six. Each two-month season corresponds to a dosha; for example, the two seasons that correspond to the dosha named "Pitta" (see "Raktamoksha") constitute the period of mid-March through mid-July. But some proponents enumerate three seasons: summer (when pitta predominates), autumn, and winter (the season of kapha); or Vata season (fall and winter), Kapha season (spring), and Pitta season (summer). According to Ayurvedic theory, one should lessen one's intake of foods that increase ("aggravate") the ascendant dosha.

AYURVEDA